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New Study Warns Alcohol Consumption Could Up Breast Cancer Risk

New Study Warns Alcohol Consumption Could Up Breast Cancer Risk


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Young women who love their wine and beer might be the most at risk for breast cancer

The study states that this risk is upped between a woman's first menstrual period and her first pregnancy.

The latest research concerning wine consumption isn't looking good for the ladies. A report published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has linked wine consumption for women in their teens and late 20s, especially before their first pregnancy, with a higher risk of breast cancer.

The study states that this risk is upped between a woman's first menstrual period and her first pregnancy. The scary stats from the reserachers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis? "The risk [of breast cancer] increased by 11 percent for every 10 grams a day of intake, about six drinks per week," compared to the risk of non-drinkers, said study author Dr. Ying Liu to Health Day. The researchers followed 91,000 women, with no history of cancer, from 1989 to 2009. The study also found that the more young women drank, the higher the risk for non-cancerous breast disease, which also contributes to breast cancer risk.

The reason for an upped risk of breast cancer is simply the timing, the researchers say. Breast tissue is "easily susceptible" to cancer-causing substances while it grows between adolescence and adulthood. The researchers say that the current trends of younger drinking ages and binge-drinking on college campuses, plus the "lengthening time" between a women's first period and pregnancy isn't helping either. Still, the researchers back up that women need to cut back on drinking at such a formative young age. "Reducing drinking to less than one drink per day, especially during this time period, is a key strategy to reducing lifetime risk of breast cancer," said study author Graham Colditz to Health Day.


Cancer Survivors at Higher Odds for Second Cancer: Study

By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Dec. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News)

Cancer survivors are at greater risk of developing another cancer and dying from it, a new study finds.

These new cancers can result from a genetic predisposition, from treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy used to fight the first cancer, as well as from unhealthy lifestyles such as smoking and obesity, according to researchers from the American Cancer Society.

Some of these factors can't be controlled, but others can, noted lead researcher Dr. Ahmedin Jemal, a senior vice president at the society.

"We can do a lot for smoking and overweight and obesity," he said. "We have to get primary care clinicians to do a more concerted effort to educate, or counsel, their patients."

Jemal added that screening smokers for breast, cervical, colon and lung cancer is essential.

Dr. Alice Police, regional director of breast surgery at Northwell Health Cancer Institute in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., said not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight can go a long way in keeping a second cancer at bay.

"More and more data are showing that these things are particularly important in cancer patients," said Police, who was not part of the study. "Particularly in breast cancer, we have a ton of data showing that those things will help prevent the second breast cancer."

She regularly speaks to patients about the importance of diet, exercise and smoking cessation in cancer prevention.

"We're not as good at that in this country as they are in Europe and other countries," Police said. "We're still mostly a fee-for-service medical establishment, and prevention doesn't pay as a treatment does, and that's really a problem in the U.S."

Drawing from 12 cancer-tracking registries, the researchers collected data on more than 1.5 million Americans who beat cancer between 1992 and 2017.

Among the survivors, more than 156,000 had a second primary cancer, and more than 88,800 died from it.

Men had an 11% higher risk of developing a second cancer and a 45% higher risk of dying from it, compared with the general population, the study found.

Women had a 10% higher risk of developing a second cancer and a 33% higher risk of dying from it, researchers reported.

Men who survived laryngeal cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma were most likely to develop another cancer, and men who survived gallbladder cancer had the greatest risk of dying from a second cancer.

Women who survived laryngeal and esophageal cancers had the greatest risk of developing another cancer. Women who survived laryngeal cancer had the greatest risk of dying from a second cancer, according to the study.

Researchers found a lot of variation between the specific types of first cancers and the types of second cancers.

Second cancers linked with smoking and obesity were most common. The risks of smoking-related second cancers were higher among those who had survived smoking-related first cancers.

Smoking-related second cancers -- including lung, urinary, bladder, oral and esophagus -- accounted for 26% to 45% of second cancers and cancer deaths.

SLIDESHOW

By itself, lung cancer accounted for 31% to 33% of all deaths from second cancers, the researchers found.

They also found that survivors of obesity-related cancers had higher odds for developing obesity-related second cancers.

Four obesity-related cancers -- colon, pancreas, endometrial and liver -- made up 22% to 26% of all deaths from second cancers, the researchers said.

Second cancers can be deadly because they are often induced by radiation or chemotherapy, and patients are then resistant to those treatments, said Dr. Anthony D'Amico, a professor of radiation oncology at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He was not involved with the study.

"As a result, you only have surgery to use, so, all the more reason why screening and early detection is even more important," D'Amico said.

He urges patients who have had one cancer to change their lifestyle to ward off another.

"If you've had cancer and you've been successfully treated, get rid of the bad habits like smoking and a poor diet," D'Amico said.

If you had chemo or radiation, you need to be monitored so another cancer can be caught early, he said. "A lot of it is just related to the fact that the thing that caused the first cancer can cause another one," D'Amico noted.

Doctors and patients can't control genetic risks, but factors like smoking, alcohol use and poor diet can be modified, D'Amico said.

The findings were published Dec. 22 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

More information

For more on second cancers, see the American Cancer Society.

SOURCES: Ahmedin Jemal, DVM, PhD, senior vice president, data science, American Cancer Society Anthony D'Amico, MD, PhD, professor, radiation oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston Alice Police, MD, Westchester regional director, breast surgery, Northwell Health Cancer Institute, Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. Journal of the American Medical Association, Dec. 22, 2020


Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Study: Radiation from mammograms may up breast cancer risk

LONDON - Mammograms aimed at finding breast cancer might actually raise the chances of developing it in young women whose genes put them at higher risk for the disease, a study by leading European cancer agencies suggests.

The added radiation from mammograms and other types of tests with chest radiation might be especially harmful to them and an MRI is probably a safer method of screening women under 30 who are at high risk because of gene mutations, the authors conclude.

The study can't prove a link between the radiation and breast cancer, but is one of the biggest ever to look at the issue. The research was published Thursday in the journal BMJ.

"This will raise questions and caution flags about how we treat women with (gene) mutations," said Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. He and the society had no role in the research.

Mammograms are most often used in women over 40, unless they are at high risk, like carrying a mutation of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Having such a mutation increases the risk of developing cancer five-fold. About one in 400 women has the gene abnormalities, which are more common in Eastern European Jewish populations. Unlike mammograms, an MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging scan, does not involve radiation.

The breast cancer screening tests have been proven to save lives and are clearly beneficial for women aged 50 and over who have an average risk of breast cancer. Experts are divided about their value in women younger than 50.

Some studies have suggested women with the genetic mutations could be more sensitive to radiation because the genes are involved in fixing DNA problems. If those genes are damaged by radiation, they may not be able to repair DNA properly, raising the cancer risk.

In several European countries including Britain, the Netherlands and Spain, doctors already advise women with BRCA mutations to get MRIs instead of mammograms before age 30. In the U.S., there is no specific advice from a leading task force of government advisers, but the American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms and MRIs from age 30 for women with BRCA gene mutations.

In the BMJ study, European researchers followed nearly 2,000 women over 18 with one of the gene mutations in Britain, France and the Netherlands. Participants reported their previous chest X-rays and mammograms, including the age of their first screening and the number of procedures. About 850 women were later diagnosed with breast cancer. Roughly half of them had X-rays while one third had at least one mammogram, at an average age of 29.

The researchers did not have a breakdown of how many women were exposed to chest radiation before age 30 but estimated that for every 100 women aged 30 with a gene mutation, nine will develop breast cancer by age 40.

They projected the number of cases would increase by five if all of them had one mammogram before age 30. But they cautioned their results should be interpreted with caution because most women didn't have a mammogram before 30.

Researchers found women with a history of chest radiation in their 20s had a 43 percent increased relative risk of breast cancer compared to women who had no chest radiation at that age. Any exposure before age 20 seemed to raise the risk by 62 percent. Radiation after age 30 did not seem to affect breast cancer risk.

"We believe countries who use mammograms in women under 30 should reconsider their guidelines," said Anouk Pijpe of the Netherlands Cancer Institute, one of the study authors. "It may be possible to reduce the risk of breast cancer in (high-risk) women by using MRIs, so we believe physicians and patients should consider that."

Lichtenfeld said the study wouldn't immediately change advice from the American Cancer Society but said concerned women should talk to their doctor about their options. "It's not possible today to make a blanket statement about what women (with the gene mutations) should do, but physicians and patients need to weigh the risks and benefits carefully," he said.


More Evidence: Drinking May Up Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study out of Europe supports the notion that drinking raises women's risk of breast cancer.

Researchers from five Spanish universities looked at data on more than 334,000 women aged 35 to 70, across 10 European countries. Nearly 12,000 of the women developed breast cancer over the study period.

Reporting recently in the International Journal of Cancer, the investigators found that the risk of breast cancer quadrupled with each daily glass of wine or beer. The study wasn't designed to prove cause-and-effect, however, only to show an association.

In a new release from the journal, study co-author Maria Dolores Chirlaque said that "a daily intake of one glass of wine or beer -- or less -- would correspond to a risk value of 1. However, if we increase our intake to two daily glasses of wine or beer, our risk would rise by 4 percent."

The risk continues to rise along with higher alcohol consumption, she added.

Continued

The time in life and the number of years a woman drinks also seemed to affect her breast cancer risk, the study found. The longer a women drank, the greater her risk, especially if she started drinking before her first pregnancy.

The good news? This is a modifiable risk factor.

"Alcohol intake is a breast cancer risk factor that can be changed by a personal decision to form healthy habits," Chirlaque said. So, "women must be advised and forewarned of the possibility they have to control this factor."

As to why drinking might boost breast cancer risk, she pointed out that, in the study, drinking increased the chances of both hormone-receptor-negative as well as hormone-receptor-positive breast cancers. "So, everything points to non-hormonal causes that need to be further investigated," Chirlaque said.


Obesity, alcohol may up breast cancer risk: Study

Sydney: Drinking one alcoholic drink daily as well as being overweight can increase the risk of developing breast cancer, warns a study of over two lakh women.

“That means that consequently, even relatively small preventable proportions translate into large numbers of preventable breast cancers,” said Maarit Laaksonen, from the University of New South Wales in Australia.

Over the next decade, drinking alcohol will lead to 13 per cent increase of breast cancer cases in pre-menopausal women and six per cent in post-menopausal breast cancers. Being overweight or obese will contribute to 13 per cent cases.

Together, these modifiable risk factors — regular alcohol consumption and excessive weight gain — will be responsible for nearly 30,000 cases of breast cancer by next decade, noted the study published in the International Journal of Cancer.

Further, the use of menopausal hormone therapy was found to account for seven per cent of post-menopausal breast cancers, with over 90 per cent of this burden caused by a long-term use.

Similarly, long-term use of oral contraceptives accounted for seven per cent of pre-menopausal breast cancers.

However, it is not recommended that women restrict their use of oral contraceptives as they are actually cancer-protective and provide long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancers, suggesting that the potential benefits, including reproductive benefits, outweigh the harms, Laaksonen said, adding that further studies are needed to confirm the results.

Maintaining a healthy weight and not consuming alcohol regularly could help prevent thousands of breast cancer cases, he suggested.


Covid: The Looming Breast Cancer Crisis

It’s coming. I can feel it in the hallways at work. I can see it in the numbers. These numbers haven’t hit the mainstream news, I guess because they lack the splash of the ticker tape stats declaring today’s “worldwide-winner” of COVID-19 cases and COVID-19 deaths. But believe me, SARS-CoV-2 will soon indirectly cause a spike in non-virus-related breast cancer illness and death.

You see, breast cancer screening and detection rates are waaay down, but that doesn’t mean the cancers don’t exist. No, they continue their silent modus operandi of “divide and multiply” just the same as prior to the pandemic (actually, 0.3 percent higher than last year[1]). Cancer doesn’t quarantine itself or shelter in place, and when it comes to your breast health, neither should you.

Alarmingly, at the same time that breast cancer screening has taken a dramatic nosedive, many a woman’s response to COVID-19 has been to escalate her risk factors for the disease: more alcohol increased consumption of snacks, processed and comfort foods weight gain less exercise combined with sedentary days elevated stress levels.

Below, I detail the solutions you must know about and what you can do today about a possibly undetected cancer that might really flourish in an amped up cellular environment stoked by the above risk factors. Unless we alter course quickly, the next several years will bring a spike in more advanced-stage cancers due to the delay in diagnosis coupled with women unintentionally embracing the very lifestyle choices that have been scientifically shown to elevate breast cancer risk.

Tickets to the Virtual 2021 Cancer-Kicking! Summit with Dr. Kristi Funk are on sale this October only!

A Quick Look at the Numbers

COVID-19 has impacted breast cancer screening by declining the following types of care:[2]

  • Breast Imaging: 61.7%
  • Breast Genetics Consults: 26.4%
  • Breast Surgery: 20.5%
  • Breast Cancer Diagnoses[3]: 51.8%

The halting of “elective” breast cancer screening due to the emergence of COVID‐19 has negatively affected screening, diagnosing, and treatment of breast cancer, as well as increased risk for high-risk patients due to lower genetic counseling and prophylactic surgery. If you are due for breast screening (mammogram, ultrasound, breast MRI, or clinical breast exam), the same simple rules we already know apply so that you can get through your screening appointment safely:

  • Wear a mask at all times
  • BYOP! (Bring Your Own Pen) for signing forms
  • Consider wearing disposable gloves
  • Use hand sanitizer after you sign in
  • Sit or stand 6 feet apart from others in the waiting room
  • Use hand sanitizer as you leave the facility
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds as soon as you can
  • That’s it, so schedule your appointment

Other Risk Factors Are Rising

Let’s break down how the pandemic has caused the 5 most important controllable breast cancer risk factors to skyrocket, and before they rise further, let’s understand what you can do to protect your breasts against each of them.

1. Alcohol

From Zoom happy hours to “wine o’clock”, people are grabbing a drink to take the edge off pandemic anxiety. Week after week, the average increase in alcohol sales has reached 477% (online purchases) and 27% (in-store purchases) above pre-COVID-19 volumes.[4]

Your Breasts Care Because

  • Alcohol does not destroy coronavirus as some believe, but it does weaken your immune system, increase estrogen levels (80%of breast cancers are fueled by estrogen) and interfere with your body’s ability to convert folate into its DNA-protective form, methylfolate. All of this contributes to alcohol being a risk factor for breast cancer. One drink a day elevates risk by 10%[5], two drinks a day 30%[6], three drinks a day 40% and up from there. Use the popular alcohol risk analyzer to calculate your personal risk based on age and frequency of alcohol consumption. Overall, the evidence suggests that there is “no safe limit” of alcohol to consume. The American Cancer Society advises that people who choose to drink limit their intake to no more than 2 per day for men and 1 a day for women.[7]

Your Solutions

  • Enjoy the Mocktail recipes from our Cancer-Kicking! Kitchen. I have been posting one monthly after it became clear that Covid would not go away soon. Pour them into your wine or martini glass instead of the real deal.
  • If you’re not a Mocktails kinda girl, supplement with Cosmo Companion. It’s affordable, and the only product of its kind. Cosmo Companion provides your cells with DNA protection via the bioactive form of methylfolate as well as 15 botanicals that support liver function, detoxification, alcohol metabolism and glucose stability to minimize the impact of the drink(s) you are having.

Stay Connected

Stay Connected

2. Stress

Financial difficulties, social isolation, uncertainty about the future, and increased parenting responsibilities (zoom school, anyone?) represent just a few of the seemingly endless COVID-19-related stressors.

Your Breasts Care Because

  • A meta-analysis of 300 studies confirms that stress alters immunity.[8]
  • The Life After Cancer Epidemiology study (LACE) followed over 2200 early stage breast cancer patients for 10.8 years. Those reporting low levels of support from friends and family and/or lack of religious or social participation were 58% more likely to have died during the study period than those with high levels of support.[9] You read that right, 58%!

Your Solutions

  • Connect with others, even if by Zoom or FaceTime and the like.
  • Make time to unwind. Do activities you enjoy.
  • Meditate daily. If you have never meditated or need a helping hand, try an app like Calm or Headspace.
  • Forgive those who hurt and upset you. Forgiveness improves both mental and physical health it lessens anxiety, anger, and depression reduces stress relaxes facial muscles and decreases cortisol levels and blood pressure.[10]
  • If you are short on time, take 5 seconds to inhale through your nose, and 8 seconds to exhale from your mouth. Set an hourly alarm to take three – deep – breaths.
  • If you find yourself moody, anxious or even depressed, or if you have had such issues in the past, learn about the incredible power of saffron, an ancient medicinal spice extracted from the beautiful crocus sativus flower. 15mg twice a day (no more, no less) of this completely natural supplement proves just as effective as prescription medication for mood swings and depression.
  • For those going through cancer diagnosis-related stress: Join the Breast Buddies program – a free online community with thousands of thrivers. Breast Buddies pairs newly diagnosed women stage-for stage, age-for-age, and treatment-for-treatment with those who have been there/done that for the purposes of friendship and support. So, while not everyone has a BFF – or a family they like – everyone can have a breast buddy!

Tickets to the Virtual 2021 Cancer-Kicking! Summit with Dr. Kristi Funk are on sale this October only!

3. Weight Gain

WebMD polled readers and found that 50% of women and 25% of men said they have gained weight during COVID-19.[11] Weight gain, or the “Quarantine 15”, can easily happen. Comfort food recipes and “stress baking” are all the rage. When working from home, you’ve got constant access to a kitchen or pantry filled with foods that spend “a moment on the lips and forever on the hips.” Boom, the COVID curves seem to appear overnight.

Your Breasts Care Because

  • Overweight and obese adult women have a 50 to 250% greater risk for postmenopausal breast cancer than normal weight women.[12]
  • In the United States, up to 50% of postmenopausal breast cancer deaths can be attributed to obesity.[13]
  • If you have already been diagnosed with cancer, gaining more than 5-10% of your initial weight – irrespective of baseline BMI (body mass index)—increases the risk of recurrence and reduces survival by up to 400%.[14]

Your Solutions

  • Calculate your Body Mass Index to find out if you’re too chubby, what your target weight should be, and receive more advice on weight loss.
  • Choose whole food plant-based eating (more on this later).
  • Limit or eliminate meat, poultry, fish, dairy, and eggs.
  • Curb the consumption of saturated fat and refined, processed, or sugary foods.
  • Control portions.
  • Eat slower (satiety signals from your gut to your brain can take 20 minutes)
  • Change out of those yoga pants or sweats with the expandable waistline. You need to notice when your “adult clothes” stop fitting.

Power Up on YouTube

4. Nutrition

Limited trips to the grocery store during Covid lead to less fresh fruits and vegetables and more stocking up on frozen meals and pantry-stable items that tend to be high calorie, high fat, sugary and worst of all, ultra-processed. All the extra hours at home encourage endless snacking, caloric comfort food meals, and “stress-baking.”

Your Breasts Care Because

There’s anti-cancer power in plants. Compounds in fruits, vegetables and legumes interfere with cancer cell signals, encourage cancer cell suicide (apoptosis), inhibit angiogenesis (the blood vessel growth all cancers require to survive), lower estrogen levels, and boost your immune system.

  • Just 26 grams of fiber a day can decrease breast cancer by 40%.[15]
  • An apple a day keeps breast cancer away by 24% (vs. those eating fewer apples).[16]
  • A study of 52,000 African American women showed a 41% drop in breast cancer for those eating 6 or more servings of cruciferous vegetables a week.[17]
  • A French study showed an astounding 75% drop in breast cancer with eleven to twelve weekly servings of fresh allium vegetables such as garlic and onions.[18]
  • The equivalent of half a button mushroom dropped breast cancer rates in Chinese women by 64% compared with age-matched “no mushroom” eaters.[19]

Your Solutions

  • Prioritize whole food plant-based eating: fruits, vegetables, 100% whole grains and legumes (lentils, beans, peas) while minimizing saturated fats and refined sugars found in meat and processed foods. Sign up for awesome tips and delicious plant-based recipes from our Cancer-Kicking! Kitchen.
  • Stock up on beans, peas, lentils, 100% whole grains (brown rice, wild rice, oats, quinoa, whole rye, whole barley, whole wheat pasta, popcorn), nuts and seeds, frozen fruits and vegetables.
  • If you already know your diet is sub-optimal, start supplementing with the Multi Must Have for women. It is 100% plant-based, contains bioactive & metabolism-ready B Vitamins and the correct active chelates and naturally soluble minerals that you are missing out on due to your nutrient-deficient diet.
  • Don’t bring chips, crackers, cookies, candies, pretzels, snack bars, ice cream and the like into your home, where it taunts you at eye level and within arm’s reach.
  • If you can afford it, use a home delivery grocery service or shop online from a market that delivers or prepares your bags so you can just zip in and out to pick them up.

We’ve been working hard on this. Add your e-mail address and we will tell you as soon as it launches.

5. Exercise

COVID-19 closures of parks, gyms, trails, fitness studios, and other public places have resulted in reduced opportunities for physical activity. Those working from home may find themselves sitting for extended periods.

Your Breasts Care Because

  • Being sedentary increases breast cancer by as much as 40% over those who work out at moderate levels for 3-4 hours a week.[20]
  • Walking briskly for a mere 11 minutes day drops breast cancer incidence by 18%.[21]
  • Even when obese, the combination of walking thirty minutes six days a week with consuming five or more servings of daily vegetables confers a 44% survival advantage over those who adhered to one or neither of these lifestyles.[22]
  • Exercise not only boosts the immune system (important for fending off both breast cancer and COVID-19), but it also can reduce stress, prevent weight gain, and improve sleep.

Your Solutions

  • Make a plan to move every day. Exercise with family, get outdoors, use online fitness resources, take a virtual class, hire a trainer to work with you remotely, or put a little dance into that dusting as you do calorie-burning chores.
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines state that for the most overall health benefit, we should do 300 minutes (5 hours) of moderate intensity aerobic activity (like power walking) or 150 minutes (2.5 hours, that’s 22 minutes a day) of vigorous super-sweaty activity each week.[23]
  • Set exercise goals, have a routine, and make fitness a decision (not a choice). Andy has always been a pro at it, so we wake our three 11 year-old sons every school morning at 6:30am, they roll over and ignore us, but we’re all finally out the door by 7:15am and we rotate what we do – always masked, at least right now: bike 15 miles on the beach bike path, run 5 miles, or hike a 3 mile mountain trail. That way, we actively start the day on a positive note. Daily exercise box, checked!

Two Invitations

We barely just scratched the surface with this post. I invite you to join me for my upcoming Virtual Cancer-Kicking! Summit (available for download in April 2021) or my live 2-day oceanfront retreat in Southern California on October 16-17, 2021. Both summits come packed with evidence-based advice and transformative start-right-now power. I deep dive into all aspects of your entire life to dramatically improve your health.

And, to keep the risk factors we discussed in this post in check, join me, James Cameron, Jon Stewart, Alec Baldwin, Ted Danson, Tig Notaro and other notable athletes, physicians, dietitians and nurses for our Let’s Beat Breast Cancer campaign, spearheaded by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. We encourage women to take a pledge to follow a four-pronged approach to breast cancer risk reduction. You will receive a free e-cookbook, chances to win giveaway swag (including a Vitamix and the popular Multi Must Have women’s vitamin from our friends at Pink Lotus Elements) and you will get weekly newsletters with practical advice on how to integrate the above steps into your daily life.


Breast cancer risk

Higher soy intake was also associated with less reported fatigue.

Weight loss - A potential treatment for breast cancer

Excess weight raises the risk of breast cancer as fat cells produce hormones that help drive tumours.

80% women at high risk of breast cancer decline to get screened: Study

Early detection has been shown to be associated with reduced breast cancer morbidity and mortality.

Women, take note! Statins may reduce breast cancer risk

The findings showed that compared to those without high cholesterol, patients with high cholesterol had a 45 per cent reduced risk of breast cancer, and if they did develop breast cancer, a 40 per cent reduced the chance of death.

Hormone replacement therapies may up breast cancer risk

Therapies that boost female hormones could cause specialised cancer cells to induce growth and to spread to other parts of the body, a study in the US showed.

Ladies, take note! Consuming 7 or more alcoholic beverages per week increases breast cancer risk

Previous studies have already established alcohol as a risk factor for breast cancer, however, most of those studies have been conducted in predominantly white populations.

Ladies, take note! Commonly found chemical in plastics may increase breast cancer belligerence

The researchers studied the effects of BPS on estrogen receptor-alpha and the BRCA1 gene.

Breast cancer: Taking contraceptives, colouring hair increase your risk

A new study suggests that dying hair or using hormonal contraceptives may increase the risk of breast cancer among women.

Artificial intelligence that can help predict breast cancer risk faster

The computer software intuitively translates patient charts into diagnostic information at 30 times human speed and with 99 per cent accuracy, the researchers reported in a paper published online in the journal Cancer.

Stick to Ƌ:2 diet' to cut breast cancer risk!

The Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention study found that following a low-calorie diet for two days per week or a 5:2 dietcan lead to cancer-preventing changes in the breast tissue.

Chemical exposure to foetal mammary gland can up breast cancer risk

The findings of the animal study showed that BPA directly affects the mammary gland of mouse embryos.

Eating carrots daily can reduce breast cancer risk by 60%

The research found women with high levels of vitamins called carotenes, which can also be found in vegetables like spinach and red peppers, in their blood faced a lower risk of developing certain types of breast cancer.

Sugary Western diet ups breast cancer risk, says study

Previous studies have shown that dietary sugar intake has an impact on breast cancer development, with inflammation thought to play a role.

Most women unaware of alcohol's role in breast cancer

Most of the women were unable to name any risk factors for breast cancer at all.

American Cancer Society eases mammogram guidelines

The society, which has for years taken the most aggressive approach to screening, issued new guidelines yesterday, recommending that women with an average risk of breast cancer start having mammograms at 45 and continue once a year until 54, then every other year for as long as they are healthy and likely to live another 10 years.

Breast cancer: Lose weight to lower your risk

Being overweight doesn't just make you feel upset and frustrated. It can also have serious implications on your health. And one such ill effect of being obese is breast cancer.

Breast cancer: Top five ways to reduce your risk!

While researchers and health experts are still not certain how to prevent breast cancer, maintaining healthy habits can help reduce your risk.

Natural compound can cut breast cancer risk

A natural compound found in herbs such as parsley and vegetables like celery and broccoli could reduce the breast cancer risk for women who have undegone hormone replacement therapy.

Fasting reduces breast cancer risk

Overnight fasting may reduce the risk of breast cancer among women, says a study.

Smoking and genetics can boost mother's chances to have twins: Study

A new study has revealed that African American mothers who smoke and have a specific genetic profile can boost their chances to have twins.


Dietary choices to help prevent breast cancer

No single food or diet can prevent or cause breast cancer, but a person’s dietary choices can make a difference to their risk of developing breast cancer or their overall well-being while living with the condition.

Breast cancer is a complex disease with many contributing factors. Some of these factors, including age, family history, genetics, and gender, are not within a person’s control.

However, a person can control other factors, such as smoking, physical activity levels, body weight, and diet. Some researchers have suggested that dietary factors could be responsible for 30–40% of all cancers.


Fresh fruits and vegetables may help prevent breast cancer.

Breast cancer can start in different places, grow in different ways, and require different kinds of treatment. Just as particular types of cancer respond better to certain treatments, some cancers respond well to specific foods.

The following foods can play a role in a healthful diet in general, and they may also help prevent the development or progression of breast cancer:

  • a variety of fruits and vegetables, including salad
  • foods that are rich in fiber, such as whole grains, beans, and legumes
  • low fat milk and dairy products
  • soybean-based products
  • foods rich in vitamin D and other vitamins
  • foods, particularly spices, with anti-inflammatory properties
  • foods — mainly plant based — that contain antioxidants

Dietary patterns that prioritize these foods include :

  • A southern diet that is high in cooked greens, legumes, and sweet potatoes
  • A Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes fresh fruits and vegetables and healthful oils
  • Any “prudent” diet that contains plenty of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fish

A study of 91,779 women found that following a diet comprising mainly plants could cut the risk of developing breast cancer by 15%.

Along with their other benefits, fruits and vegetables are rich in flavonoids and carotenoids, which appear to have various medical benefits.

Studies have suggested that the following foods may help prevent breast cancer:

  • dark, green, leafy vegetables, such as kale and broccoli
  • fruits, especially berries and peaches
  • beans, pulses, fish, eggs, and some meat

Researchers have associated beta carotene, which occurs naturally in vegetables such as carrots, with a lower risk of breast cancer. Scientists speculate that this may be because it interferes with the growth process of cancer cells.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recommend consuming between five and nine servings of fresh fruit and vegetables a day.

Research into dietary fiber and its effect on breast cancer is currently inconclusive, but several studies have suggested that it can help protect against the disease.

Excess estrogen can be a factor in the development and spread of some types of breast cancer. Some treatments aim to keep estrogen from interacting with breast cancer cells. Eating a high fiber diet can support this process and accelerate the elimination of estrogen.

Fiber supports the digestive system and the regular elimination of waste, including excess estrogen. It helps the body eliminate toxins and limits the damage that they can do.

The way that fiber binds to estrogen in the gut may also help prevent the body from absorbing too much estrogen. These factors may help reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes provide fiber, but they also contain antioxidants, including beta carotene and vitamins C and E.

Antioxidants can help prevent many diseases by reducing the numbers of free radicals, which are waste substances that the body naturally produces. A 2013 meta-analysis found that people who eat more whole grains may have a lower risk of breast cancer.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 recommend an intake of up to 33.6 grams of fiber a day, depending on a person’s age and sex.


Avocado is a good source of healthful fats.

Fatty foods can lead to obesity, and people with obesity appear to have a higher risk of developing cancer, including breast cancer.

Some dietary fat is necessary for the body to work properly, but it is important to consume the right type.

Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can be beneficial in moderation. They are present in:

Cold water fish, such as salmon and herring, contain a healthful polyunsaturated fat called omega-3. This fat may also help reduce the risk of breast cancer.

The authors of a 2015 study cited a rodent study in which rodents that consumed 8¬–25% of their calories as omega-3 fats appeared to have a 20–35% lower chance of developing breast cancer.

They also cited another study involving over 3,000 women, which showed that those who consumed high levels of omega-3 had a 25% lower risk of breast cancer recurrence over the next 7 years.

The health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids might be due to their ability to reduce inflammation. Inflammation may be a contributing factor for breast cancer.

Soy is a healthful food source that may help reduce the risk of breast cancer. It is a plant based product that is rich in protein, healthful fat, vitamins, and minerals but low in carbohydrates. It also contains antioxidants known as isoflavones.

The authors of a 2017 study that looked at data for 6,235 women concluded that, overall, “a higher dietary intake of isoflavone was associated with reduced all-cause mortality.” The researchers were investigating whether soy consumption was a good idea for people with breast cancer.

Soy may also help reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad,” cholesterol and lower the risk of heart disease. Along with obesity, these conditions are risk factors that contribute to metabolic syndrome, which involves inflammation.

Inflammation may play a role in breast cancer, although the role that it plays remains uncertain.

Soy is present in foods such as:

Some people question whether soy might increase the risk of breast cancer because it contains isoflavones, which resemble estrogen.

However, the author of a 2016 review article notes that estrogen is not the same as isoflavones and that the two are unlikely to behave in the same way. According to the author, the North American Menopause Society have concluded that isoflavones do not increase the risk of breast cancer.

Foods that may increase the risk of different kinds of cancer, including breast cancer, include:

Alcohol

Studies have identified a link between regular alcohol consumption and an increased risk of breast cancer.

Breastcancer.org report that alcohol may increase estrogen levels and cause damage to DNA. They also note that women who drink three alcoholic beverages per week increase their risk of developing breast cancer by 15%.

According to estimates, the risk goes up by about 10% with each additional drink per day.

Sugar

In research from 2016, mice that ate a diet that was as rich in sugar as the typical diet in the U.S. were more likely to develop mammary gland tumors similar to breast cancer in humans.

In addition, these tumors were more likely to spread, or metastasize.

Studies suggest that not all fats are bad. Although fat from processed foods appears to increase the risk of breast cancer, some plant based fats may help reduce it.

Trans fats are a type of fat that is common in processed and premade foods. Scientists have linked it with a higher risk of breast cancer. Trans fats most commonly occur in processed foods, such as fried foods, some crackers, donuts, and packaged cookies or pastries. People should limit their intake of trans fats where possible.

Red meat

Some studies have found a link between red meat and an increased risk of breast cancer, especially if a person cooks the meat at high temperatures, which can trigger the release of toxins.

In addition, processed meats and cold cuts tend to be high in fat, salt, and preservatives. These may increase rather than reduce the risk of breast cancer. Overall, minimizing the processing of a food makes it more healthful.


Turmeric may have anti-inflammatory properties that help prevent breast cancer.

Vitamin D from foods and sunlight exposure may help protect against breast cancer. Vitamin D is present in eggs, cold water fish, and fortified products. A person can consult a doctor to check their vitamin D levels. If these are low, the doctor may recommend a supplement.

Green tea may have several beneficial health effects. It contains antioxidants, and these may help strengthen the immune system and reduce the risk of breast cancer.

Turmeric is a yellow spice that may have anti-inflammatory properties that could limit the growth of breast cancer cells.

Maintaining a healthy body weight is beneficial for well-being in general, but it is particularly important for people who wish to prevent the development or recurrence of breast cancer. Obesity is a known risk factor for the disease.

Exercise is also important. The National Cancer Institute report that women who exercise for 4 hours per week or longer have a lower risk of breast cancer.

Talking to other people with the condition, exchanging recipes, and sharing stories about which foods have helped may be beneficial.

The Breast Cancer Healthline app provides people with access to an online breast cancer community, where users can connect with others and gain advice and support through group discussions.

Following a healthful diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables and low in added sugar and trans fats may reduce the risk of breast cancer.

It can also lower the risk of obesity, a condition that increases the likelihood of a person developing breast and other cancers.


Obesity, alcohol may up breast cancer risk: Study

Sydney: Drinking one alcoholic drink daily as well as being overweight can increase the risk of developing breast cancer, warns a study of over two lakh women.

Sydney: Drinking one alcoholic drink daily as well as being overweight can increase the risk of developing breast cancer, warns a study of over two lakh women. “That means that consequently, even relatively small preventable proportions translate into large numbers of preventable breast cancers,” said Maarit Laaksonen, from the University of New South Wales in [&hellip]

"That means that consequently, even relatively small preventable proportions translate into large numbers of preventable breast cancers," said Maarit Laaksonen, from the University of New South Wales in Australia.

Over the next decade, drinking alcohol will lead to 13 per cent increase of breast cancer cases in pre-menopausal women and six per cent in post-menopausal breast cancers. Being overweight or obese will contribute to 13 per cent cases.

Together, these modifiable risk factors -- regular alcohol consumption and excessive weight gain -- will be responsible for nearly 30,000 cases of breast cancer by next decade, noted the study published in the International Journal of Cancer.

Further, the use of menopausal hormone therapy was found to account for seven per cent of post-menopausal breast cancers, with over 90 per cent of this burden caused by a long-term use.

Similarly, long-term use of oral contraceptives accounted for seven per cent of pre-menopausal breast cancers.

However, it is not recommended that women restrict their use of oral contraceptives as they are actually cancer-protective and provide long-term protection against endometrial and ovarian cancers, suggesting that the potential benefits, including reproductive benefits, outweigh the harms, Laaksonen said, adding that further studies are needed to confirm the results.

Maintaining a healthy weight and not consuming alcohol regularly could help prevent thousands of breast cancer cases, he suggested.

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Beware women! Working night shifts may up breast cancer risk

A new study has claimed that women who work in night shifts have increased risk of developing breast cancer, as artificial light blocks a hormone that plays a key role in suppressing growth of its tumours.

New York: A new study has claimed that women who work in night shifts have increased risk of developing breast cancer, as artificial light blocks a hormone that plays a key role in suppressing growth of its tumours.

The findings showed that women who were premenopausal and were current or past smokers, and also who live in areas with high levels of outdoor light at night, were at risk of developing breast cancer - the most common cancer in women worldwide.

Lead author Peter James, Assistant Professor at Harvard University said,"In our modern industrialised society, artificial lighting is nearly ubiquitous. Our results suggest that this widespread exposure to outdoor lights during night time hours could represent a novel risk factor for breast cancer."

Melatonin, a hormone produced in the human brain, appears to suppress the growth of breast cancer tumours, but exposure to light may decrease its levels, thus disrupting circadian rhythms -- our internal "clocks" that govern sleepiness and alertness -- and, in turn, lead to increased breast cancer risk, James said, citing previous studies.

For the new study, the team looked at data from nearly 110,000 women and linked data from satellite images of Earth taken at night to residential addresses for each study participant, as well as considering the influence of night shift work.

The results showed that women exposed to the highest levels of outdoor light at night -- those in the top fifth -- had an estimated 14 per cent increased risk of breast cancer, as compared with women in the bottom fifth of exposure.

As levels of outdoor light at night increased, so did breast cancer rates, the researchers said, but acknowledged that further work is required to confirm the study findings and clarify potential mechanisms.



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